Rumble (website)

Video hosting platform

Rumble is a Canadian online video platform headquartered in Toronto, and founded in 2013. The site was founded by Chris Pavlovski, a tech entrepreneur from Canada.[1]

Contents

Users and content[edit]

For its first seven years, content on Rumble largely consisted of viral videos and news from mainstream media sources. In August 2020, however, Representative Devin Nunes accused YouTube of being overly censorious toward his channel and began posting his videos on Rumble. Other prominent conservatives and libertarians such as Dinesh D’Souza, Sean Hannity, and Representative Jim Jordan soon followed. The platform forbids pornography, harassment, racist content, and illegal content; anything else is permitted.[1][2][3][4][5]

Following the 2020 United States presidential election, many conservative users of mainstream social media platforms, such as Twitter and Facebook, migrated to Rumble.[4] According to Fortune, prior to this migration, the site was a “YouTube clone” filled with home recordings.[6]

Other users and channels on Rumble include America’s Funniest Home Videos, fact-checking website Snopes, American broadcasting company E. W. Scripps Company, Hodgetwins, cable news channels Newsmax and One America News Network (OANN), and international news organization Reuters.[1][7]

Design[edit]

The interface of Rumble features “recommended channels” to follow and an “Earnings” tab, along with four other tabs in the main interface.[7] Rumble also allows its users to generate revenue off of their videos.[7] Users upload videos that are then licensed to Rumble’s partners, such as Yahoo! and Microsoft News, and the money made from those videos is directly deposited into a user’s Rumble account.[7]

Users of Rumble can win a daily cash drawing by swiping left or right to vote on videos and earn tickets.[7] The more tickets a user has, the more entries a user can submit in the cash drawing.[7]

Google lawsuit[edit]

On January 11, 2021, Rumble filed an antitrust lawsuit against Google over its search results, seeking damages exceeding $2 Billion.[8][9] Rumble claims that Google manipulates its algorithm so as to favor Google’s YouTube over Rumble in Google’s search results. Rumble alleges that this reduces its viewership and results in lower advertising revenues.[10]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  • ^ a b c .mw-parser-output cite.citation{font-style:inherit}.mw-parser-output .citation q{quotes:”””””””‘””‘”}.mw-parser-output .id-lock-free a,.mw-parser-output .citation .cs1-lock-free a{background:linear-gradient(transparent,transparent),url(“//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/6/65/Lock-green.svg”)right 0.1em center/9px no-repeat}.mw-parser-output .id-lock-limited a,.mw-parser-output .id-lock-registration a,.mw-parser-output .citation .cs1-lock-limited a,.mw-parser-output .citation .cs1-lock-registration a{background:linear-gradient(transparent,transparent),url(“//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/d/d6/Lock-gray-alt-2.svg”)right 0.1em center/9px no-repeat}.mw-parser-output .id-lock-subscription a,.mw-parser-output .citation .cs1-lock-subscription a{background:linear-gradient(transparent,transparent),url(“//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/a/aa/Lock-red-alt-2.svg”)right 0.1em center/9px no-repeat}.mw-parser-output .cs1-subscription,.mw-parser-output .cs1-registration{color:#555}.mw-parser-output .cs1-subscription span,.mw-parser-output .cs1-registration span{border-bottom:1px dotted;cursor:help}.mw-parser-output .cs1-ws-icon a{background:linear-gradient(transparent,transparent),url(“//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/4/4c/Wikisource-logo.svg”)right 0.1em center/12px no-repeat}.mw-parser-output code.cs1-code{color:inherit;background:inherit;border:none;padding:inherit}.mw-parser-output .cs1-hidden-error{display:none;font-size:100%}.mw-parser-output .cs1-visible-error{font-size:100%}.mw-parser-output .cs1-maint{display:none;color:#33aa33;margin-left:0.3em}.mw-parser-output .cs1-format{font-size:95%}.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-left,.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-wl-left{padding-left:0.2em}.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-right,.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-wl-right{padding-right:0.2em}.mw-parser-output .citation .mw-selflink{font-weight:inherit}Silverman, Craig (November 2, 2020). “Can Dan Bongino Make Rumble The Right’s New Platform?”. Buzzfeed News.
  • ^ Watts, Marina (October 26, 2020). “What Is Rumble? The YouTube Alternative ‘Where Conservative Views Won’t Be Discriminated Against'”. Newsweek. Retrieved January 9, 2021.
  • ^ Zakrzewski, Cat (November 16, 2020). “The Technology 202: YouTube alternative Rumble highlights conservatives’ move to more hands-off social networks”. The Washington Post. Retrieved January 9, 2021.
  • ^ a b Isaac, Mike; Browning, Kellen (November 18, 2020). “Fact-Checked on Facebook and Twitter, Conservatives Switch Their Apps”. The New York Times. Retrieved January 9, 2021.
  • ^ Mak, Aaron (December 15, 2020). “Meet Rumble, the YouTube Alternative Where Trump Could Still Win”. Slate. Retrieved January 9, 2021.
  • ^ “Meet Rumble, the YouTube rival that’s popular with conservatives”. Fortune. Retrieved January 19, 2021.
  • ^ a b c d e f Parker, Bryan C. (January 15, 2021). “The next Parler: I tried four apps attracting right-wing users”. SFGate. Retrieved January 16, 2021.
  • ^ O’Kane, Josh (January 13, 2021). “Toronto video-hosting startup Rumble Inc. sues Google over search result”. The Globe And Mail. Retrieved January 14, 2021.
  • ^ Rumble, Inc. v. Google LLC, N.D. Cal. docket 4:21-cv-00229, on Court Listener
  • ^ Schechner, Sam (January 12, 2021). “YouTube rival Rumble sues Google over search rankings”. Market Watch. Retrieved February 18, 2021.
  • External links[edit]


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